Search icon

Regenerative farming and agroecology sit at the heart of a healthy and sustainable global food system.

They are fundamental to delivering the Sustainable Development Goals (SDGs) and ensuring that future generations are food secure and have access to healthy, balanced diets.

Goldfinch perched on a thistle

Regenerative farming is both first aid and life support for the planet, people, and animals (wild or domesticated). It works with nature, supporting - and harnessing - natural processes by producing food and improving soil quality and biodiversity, at the same time.

Key characteristics include:

  • minimising the use of external inputs (such as pesticides, herbicides and synthetic fertilizers);
  • closed loop fertility;
  • integrated pest management;
  • water conservation;
  • ensuring animals don’t compete for human edible food and become a net input into the food system;
  • restoring the link between animals and the land;
  • minimising the use of antimicrobials and other pharmaceuticals;
  • diversity of plant crops and animals;
  • focus on quality, not just on quantity;
  • farmer livelihoods;
  • local solutions;
  • use of agroforestry.

Compassion in World Farming identified the connection between factory farming and its impact on people, animals, and the planet years ago. We brought the issues together in the major international conference Extinction & Livestock: Moving to a flourishing food system for wildlife, farm animals and us (2017), partnering with the World Wildlife Fund (WWF).

Attended by leading policymakers, academics and representatives of food businesses, the conference concluded that a transformative shift towards a regenerative, nature-positive food system was essential for the sustainability of life on earth. 

We are leading the way in promoting regenerative farming - supporting and recognising individuals and organisations promoting this production approach, and by influencing national and global policies.

Globe